By Eric Schmidt

The 2013 NFL Draft is in the books. After the three day extravaganza, it’s time to start second guessing some of the selections made. Although we likely won’t know the outcome of this draft for at least three or four seasons, one can look back over the last three days and see if their favorite teams did enough to fill their needs in the annual lottery.

Dallas Cowboys- The Cowboys seemingly reached with the selection of a center in the first-round. The next center didn’t come off the board until pick 107. Fredrick was the only offensive lineman the team selected. There was a thought that the Cowboys might select a running back earlier than they did. Dallas addressed their need for a safety with the addition of J.J. Wilcox.

Grade-C

Washington Redskins- With no selection in the first-round, the Redskins first selected at number 51, selecting CB David Amerson. The pick of TE Jordan Reed gives the Redskins the possibility for some interesting two tight end sets. SS Phillip Thomas should be a nice fit for their secondary. RB Chris Thompson might develop into a nice third-down back.

Grade B-

New York Giants- The Giants entered the draft with needs on both lines and used their first three picks to address those needs. The team then shocked the NFL world with the selection of QB Ryan Nassib in the fourth. I understand the value standpoint, but the Giants really could have used a linebacker or corner at that point.

Grade C

Philadelphia Eagles- The Giants weren’t the only NFC East team to make some noise with the addition of a quarterback. In the fourth, the Eagles selected Matt Barkley. How numbered are Nick Foles’ days? TE Zach Ertz was a nice addition for the Eagles offense. CB Jordan Poyer is an interesting prospect.

Grade B-

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Filed under: 2013 NFL Draft, Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, NFC, NFC East, NFL, Philadelphia Eagles, Washington Redskins

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Readers Comments (1)

  1. avatar Dan

    Two average grades, and two grades only one step away from average?

    Going out on a limb there, Schmidt.

     

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